Articles

Thyme for Figs

In Uncategorized on 08/31/2012 by jenn in the yarden

I am so excited to try a new drink at Seka Coffee house: Fig and Thyme Mocha!
I might have to fiddle around with the stuff from the yarden in the meantime.
http://community.gracelb.org/2012/08/september-featured-drink-at-seka/

Articles

yarden salad

In Uncategorized on 08/24/2012 by jenn in the yarden

yarden salad

This photo was taken by my sister who, upon receiving a bag of yarden produce, made this salad. It includes yellow crookneck squash, red shiso, oregano, and onions. She quickly sauteed the whole thing and added some simple seasonings. While I’m no foodie, I’ve learned the truth in the adage: less is more. Especially when it comes to super fresh produce. It’s best to let the vegetables speak for themselves!

Articles

Persimmon Tomatoes

In Uncategorized on 08/17/2012 by jenn in the yarden

America’s Next Top Model!

I admit to feeling a little like a high fashion photographer, taking scads of photos of this gorgeous tomato: Persimmon. I imagine her standing before a stunned Tyra Banks, glowing the competition out of the garden! Here’s her image (Persimmon’s not Tyra’s).

Imaginings aside, the following is an insight to what I do with this beautiful fruit:

Spread butter and sorrel pesto on my favorite bread, toasted. Slice of Jarlsberg cheese. Slice of persimmon tomato. Smoked salt, pepper. Try it!

Articles

first week for figs

In Uncategorized on 08/03/2012 by jenn in the yarden

The Yarden has yielded its first figs of the season! In addition to making jam from these sweet jewels, I love to make the following appetizer:

Wash and halve figs. Put a dollop of goat cheese on each cut half. Place a macrona almond in the center of each dollop. Broil for a few minutes. Drizzle honey over. Wow your guests with this summertime appetizer!

Try it and tell me what you think!

Articles

Urbavore Farm Compost Bucket

In Uncategorized on 07/30/2012 by jenn in the yarden

Urbavore Farm Compost Bucket

The savvy folks at Urbavore Farm in Kansas City, MO give these snazzy buckets to those wishing to compost their kitchen wastes. They then are encouraged to empty their bucket at the farm where the detritus becomes humus, returning nutrients back into the soil and into the crops! The ideal is to close the cycle as customers buy the produce from the farm stand!

Articles

tomato faux pas/vergissing

In Uncategorized on 07/30/2012 by jenn in the yarden

the long red ones are the San Marzanos

Whoopsie daisy! All this time I thought I had been making spaghetti sauce with Pineapple tomatoes. They were the San Marzanos all along! Totally makes sense now: they are very pasty. So anytime from here on back I’ve written about Pineapple, please insert San Marzano. Thanks and apologies.

Articles

tasting tomatoes

In Uncategorized on 07/27/2012 by jenn in the yarden

While waiting to harvest the San Marzano, I’ve tasted and ranked the other 7 varieties of tomatoes I’m growing this year. Here are the rankings. I suspect next week I’ll have a complete list.
Stupice and Juliet are the best “Off-the-vine-while-I’m-watering” varieties. My favorite thing to do is pick a couple of herb leaves, say basil or shiso, and eat them with a Stupice or Juliet right then and there while hose-irrigating the yarden. My version of fast-food.
The Paul Robeson is not only other-worldly looking, but outstanding on buttered toast with freshly ground pepper and Cypress salt flakes. I’m actually quite proud that this year I was able to grow this heirloom variety. Past tries were less than fruitful.
The Green Zebra is not getting a great ranking because of my bias against its production. I know it’s not fair, but there you go. It does rank highly for its appearance. The green on green is so cool!
The Pineapple has made it to the bottom of the list, but only as a fresh tomato. I’m sure that it will shoot to the top as a sauce tomato, for which, I believe is what it was bred. Now to make that sauce…
The Yellow Pear gets barely a mention because I take it for granted. It’s an annual standby. A reliable producer of bright, candy-sized, candy-sweet fruits.
Just yesterday, Matilda and I picked the first Persimmon tomato. Probably the most impressive looking fruit yet! It is a weighty, classic-shaped tomato, exactly the color of a persimmon! I can’t wait to try it on toast!